Thursday, September 29, 2011

Montreal Architectural Heritage Campaign: Montreal Beauties

Every year in September and October the city of Montreal presents the Montréal Architectural Heritage Campaign. The goal of the campaign is to "discover the amazing wealth of the built heritage, of the importance of caring for it and of the necessity of respectfully preserving its original character." A great initiative, isn't it?

I honestly spend all year looking forward to the various activities offered. Like an early Christmas!! These include free walking and bus tours of both well known and not so well known neighborhoods, free entry to museums with exhibits related to architecture and open houses of historic homes currently on the market. This year there will be two Sundays of open houses, October 3 and October 9. For those of us who are especially nosy (me!), the open houses are delightful! 

During a public ceremony held on September 23, 2011 in Montréal City Hall, 26 property owners received a Heritage Emeritus Award for the meticulous care of their properties. These are building are the 2011 Montreal Beauties! 

Here are some of my favorite beauties with the description from the M.A.H.C. website:

 

Ahuntsic-Cartierville Borough

residential  
Heritage Emeritus Award  |  Residential category
Built in 1958 according to the plans of architect André Blouin, this modern-style single-family home stands out with its elongated façade, vertical wood cladding and rounded stone wall. A lot of care was put into this house to preserve and highlight the distinctive roof structure as well as the original wood windows and doors. Its sustained maintenance is noteworthy.
 
 
Beaconsfield
residential 
Heritage Emeritus Award  |  Residential category
This exceptional modern-style home was built in 1966 according to the plans of famous architect Roger d’Astous. The property stands out with its recently restored cedar-shingle siding. The abundant windows and mix of exterior covering in wood and field stone allow for perfect building integration into the environment.

 

Côte-des-Neiges – Notre-Dame-de-Grâce Borough

résidentiel 
Heritage Emeritus Award  |  Residential category
This magnificent house was built in 1910. It features a balustrade, wrought iron, triangular pediment with sloped roof and mouldings, parapet and oriel window with ornamental mouldings. It is typically Montréal. This Notre-Dame-de-Grâce jewel stands out thanks to quality renovation work and careful maintenance.

 

LaSalle Borough

resdential  
Heritage Emeritus Award  |  Residential category
This single-family home was built in 1961 according to the plans of famous architect and designer Jean-Maurice Dubé, to whom we owe the Verdun Métro station and Marguerite-de-Lajemerrais school. The stone and brick façade and abundant windows make this house stand out, and the impressive four-sided gable roof adds volume to the property.

Town of Mount-Royal

residential 
Heritage Emeritus Award  |  Residential category
Built in 1951, this semi-detached house has been well maintained over the years. The upper dormers, commanding eaves, brick inserts, wood shutters and entrances add great charm to the building.

 

Town of Montréal West

residential 
Heritage Emeritus Award  |  Residential category
This 1920 house features architectural elements that were inspired by the Arts and Crafts movement. Note the farmhouse style mansard, wood windows and louvers. Evidently, this house has been carefully maintained over the years. 

Outremont Borough

residential 
Heritage Emeritus Award  |  Residential category
This building, known as the presbytery of the first Saint-Viateur Church, was designed by architect Casimir St-Jean and built in 1904 across from Outremont Park. It stands out with its grey rusticated stone façade, white trim, smooth cut stone elements and high-cornice parapet. Regular maintenance of this house is noteworthy.

Plateau-Mont-Royal Borough

residential 
Heritage Emeritus Award  |  Residential category
This circa 1885 cottage, which houses a basement apartment, is part of a series of four nearly-identical buildings featuring gray limestone. Just as the neighboring buildings, it is capped with a false mansard roof which has been restored completely, keeping the woodwork, flashings, slate tiles and other original characteristics.

Rosemont – La Petite-Patrie Borough

residential 

Heritage Emeritus Award  |  Residential category
This building is a fine example of a residential property which reinvented the triplex. The proportions of the façade and architectural style give this property the appearance of a rich-looking single-family home. Careful maintenance helped to maintain the original architectural characteristics of this early-60s property.

Ville-Marie Borough

résidentiel 
Heritage Emeritus Award  |  Residential category
This residence is part of a housing complex built in 1925 in the Golden Square Mile. The complex is centered around a semi-private landscaped courtyard, away from the downtown hustle. This unit has kept all its original elements. The openings, woodwork, wrought iron elements and masonry covering have been maintained regularly over the years and give the building a definite flair.

City of Westmount

residential 
Heritage Emeritus Award  |  Residential category
This remarkable 1880 house features detailed decorative wood giving it a country look. Restoration work on the second-floor balcony as well as woodwork repair on the façade was carried out a few years ago in keeping with the building’s original character. 

What I love about these homes is that they represent the various eras of Montreal's construction. Many are turn of the twentieth century Victorians located near the downtown core but others represent the mid-century modern architecture visible in various post-war construction boom suburbs. When we hear the word heritage we often think very old, but this campaign pushes us to think of heritage in broader terms- staying true to the character and time period of your home. Interesting concept, isn't it?


For the entire list of Montreal Beauties 2011 click here.


If you'd like to check out the calendar of activities click here.


Check back tomorrow for another M.A.H.C. post. I'll be writing about the heritage open houses. Very exciting!




I'd love to know what you think about these home.

Nancy:)


2 comments:

  1. That's it. I'm coming to Montreal! What beautiful architecture. I've always wanted to visit anyway. Thanks for sharing a little of the area!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Awesome architecture. I am scrolling the page up and down, again and again. There is so much to see, so much to appreciate. Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete

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